Do You Suffer from Multiple Identity Disorder?


What is multiple identity disorder? The non-clinical version is when you show up with a different personality or set of values depending on who you’re with. You can know for sure if this applies to you by asking yourself this, “would people describe me differently depending on who I asked?”

Now before you go ahead and think I’m picking on you, I understand that some people will have a certain opinion of you no matter what you are truly like in their presence. There is always that one relative who refuses to acknowledge that you’ve become an adult even though you passed the drinking age eons ago. I’m not talking about that, though.

When you suffer from multiple identity disorder, you have a different persona at work, with friends, with clients, and with your mate. There is a distinctly different way that you speak, act, dress, and react.

I used to be like this and know how detrimental it can be. I thought I was “being professional” by keeping my spiritual life separate. I didn’t tell anyone I was psychic until I knew that it was “safe.” I also didn’t put my years of experience as a medium or a psychic development teacher on my resume.

This wasn’t only about work though, I didn’t share my real self with my extended family or anyone else that I had just met. I didn’t think it mattered.

What was really going on, was that I was afraid to lose their approval. And in doing so, I was living out of integrity with myself. I was diminishing my energy, and I was telling the universe the opinion of others was more important than my truth.

I was cowering and it didn’t feel good!

If you are in this situation, you can do infinite things – but there are basically two roads:

  1. Decide in this moment that living your truth is more important than what other people think and start living as yourself no matter what.
  2. Dig in to your psyche and uncover what gave you that fear in the first place. Develop a plan to change your beliefs surrounding that issue. Practice being yourself at work, with friends, with your mate, and everywhere else. Eventually it will stick.

You might think I am advocating number 1 because it’s more direct, and I am. I just want you to know that I went with number 2 – and most of you will do the same. With number 2, you’ll understand your patterns, what types of beliefs you most easily inherit, and just how difficult they can be to change. It’s a learning process, but it is not necessary. The power of decision is very real.

I used the word integrity above, and I meant it in its full definition:

in·teg·ri·ty [in-teg-ri-tee]
noun

  1. adherence to moral and ethical principles; soundness of moral character; honesty.
  2. the state of being whole, entire, or undiminished: to preserve the integrity of the empire.
  3. a sound, unimpaired, or perfect condition: the integrity of a ship’s hull.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/integrity

You are naturally a whole being. To separate yourself into multiple identities diminishes you so that you are not able to experience the best of you. You are taking away the essence of yourself from others, too. This sabotages any synchronicities that could happen by just being honest.

It can take courage to face those who may not understand who you are, but it takes an enormous amount of energy to put up a facade or to withhold certain parts of yourself. Is it really worth it?

My wish is that we all feel safe enough to to express our true nature – and each one of us who does so makes it easier for someone else.

What's your take away?